• FAQs About Using Documents During Remote Depositions

    Conducting remote depositions via video conference, you can save a great deal of time and money. However, there are some challenges in remote depositions that don’t exist for in-person meetings. One such issue is how to use documents when your meeting is conducted through video conferencing. If you are considering arranging a remote deposition but are wondering how to manage the documents you’ll need during testimony, here are the answers to some of the questions you may have on your mind.

    Will I have to submit my documents in advance?

    FAQs answered by Pulone Reporting Services

    Although sending documents in advance is one way to deal with the issue, doing so has its disadvantages. Showing the other side the documents you plan to use during the deposition will give them a chance to prepare for your questions, eliminating any element of surprise that could work in your favor. Instead of sending documents to opposing counsel in advance, you may wish to send your documents to your court reporting firm to reveal the documents in real time, as you would during an in-person deposition.

    How can I see modifications of a document?

    If it is necessary for a witness in a deposition to modify a document at your request, you will need to see that he or she has done so in the way you asked. Although holding up the document to the camera gives you a chance to get a closer look, it can be more efficient to have your court reporter present the document digitally and for modifications to be made to the digital file in real time, so that everyone who is viewing the document can see the modifications at once.

    Can I use multiple documents during a remote deposition?

    Once you master the ability to transmit documents during a video conference deposition, then using multiple documents is simple. The trick is to work with your court reporting firm to prepare for the deposition, so that they can manage the documents and ensure they are each shared in the order and at the time you intend for the witnesses to see them.

  • Making a Good Impression on Camera

    Video conferencing is being used with greater frequency, as it’s convenient and allows professionals to cut down on time spent traveling. Perhaps the most effective way to make a great impression on camera is to rent a conference room in the Bay Area that has the right equipment for professional video conferencing, as it prevents the possibility of serious technical glitches. Next, you’ll need to dress professionally for the camera. Find out how by watching the accompanying video.

    It features a professional speaker who recommends getting in touch with the host of the video to ask about the background. If the background is a green screen, don’t wear anything green. If it’s a white background, choose darker colors for contrast. In addition, stick to solid colors without patterns.

  • When Should You Use an Interpreter for a Video Conference?

    During a video conference in the Bay Area , an interpreter can be a valuable resource. There are several instances in which interpreting may be needed during video conferencing, and these circumstances are only becoming more common in today’s global marketplace. Here are just a few of the instances in which an interpreter can be helpful in your video conference.

    You’re conducting a deposition with a language barrier.

    Interpreter for a legal proceeding in San Jose

    If you’re conducting a remote deposition via video conference with someone who speaks a different language, working with a court certified interpreter is key. It is extremely important for the person being deposed to understand your questions exactly and to be able to convey precise answers to you. An interpreter can help not only with translating the testimony word for word but also with capturing context and idioms that could otherwise interfere with understanding. When you hire an interpreter for a legal proceeding, make sure that person speaks the same dialect of the language as the person being deposed.

    You’re hosting an international business meeting.

    In an international company, video conferencing brings people together without the expense of travel and accommodation. However, language barriers can present difficulties in sharing information that can only be overcome with an interpreter. You may need multiple interpreters to take part in the same meeting if you have locations across several countries. Interpreters can also help businesses conduct transactions across borders with customers who speak a different language. Hiring an interpreter for this kind of transaction lets your business ensure that your customers understand all of the aspects of the deal.

    You’re a doctor conducting telemedicine visits.

    Video conferencing is instrumental in providing healthcare access to people in rural locations through telemedicine services. However, doctors and patients need to be able to communicate freely with each other, and when they don’t speak the same language, that will be impossible. An interpreter can make sure patients get the care they need and help doctors understand what their patients are telling them.

  • Hosting a Video Conference? Avoid These Etiquette Mistakes

    Video conferencing makes it easier than ever to host remote depositions and conduct business across borders without travel costs. To get the most from your video conference, however, there are certain etiquette rules to follow to ensure that your event goes smoothly. If you are hosting a video conference in San Jose, avoid these mistakes to prevent confusion and delays from taking over your session.

     Mistakes in a video conference at San Jose

    Mistake: Not Testing Your System

    Nothing slows down video conferences like problems with connections, audio, and video. Test out your video conferencing system before you attempt your conference so you don’t waste participants’ time. Even better, work with an experienced team that can help you choose the right video conferencing solutions for your needs. When you work with professionals who host video conferences on a regular basis, you can feel confident that their system is reliable and that their conference space is set up for optimum audio and visual output.

    Mistake: Not Using Your Normal Voice

    During a video conference, as long as you direct your speech towards the microphone, there is no reason to shout or dramatically slow down your speech. Speak normally, being as careful as you would during an in-person meeting to enunciate. Resist mumbling or speaking excessively quickly. This kind of speech is difficult to understand in an in-person meeting and even more challenging during a video conference. Keep in mind that there is typically a small delay in audio transmission during video conferences, so pause at the end of your statement to let people hear the entire thing and have time to respond, if necessary.

  • Deposition Corrections 101

    When a deponent wants to change his or her deposition testimony from what the transcript reflects, there are several factors to consider. Although changing the testimony is per California law, doing so is not always in the best interest of your case. After you receive a transcript of testimony from your court reporter in San Jose and discover that your client needs to make a change, here is what you need to know.

    Deposition Corrections by Pulone Reporting Services

    What are some reasons for correcting depositions?

    Generally, the reason to consider changing deposition testimony is to make sure it accurately reflects everything that the deponent knows about the case. If the original testimony left out important details or could otherwise be misinterpreted, correcting it during the deposition review prevents the need for the deponent to have to change his or her testimony during trial. Substantive errors about facts of the case or transcription mistakes that change the meaning of the testimony can all adversely affect a case, even before it gets to trial, if depositions are used in pretrial hearings and negotiations. For these reasons, correcting a deposition that contains errors could be advantageous.

    What are the drawbacks of correcting depositions?

    Although correcting a deposition prevents the opposing counsel from pointing out inconsistencies in testimony at trial, the need to correct testimony even during the deposition review opens the door for the opposing counsel to call all of that deponent’s testimony into question as unreliable. Making corrections could also highlight a weakness in your case that might otherwise have gone unnoticed by the opposing counsel. When you make corrections to any part of a deponent’s testimony, you could inadvertently miss small details that should have been updated during the change as well, which can cast the testimony as unreliable overall.

    How can you decide whether to correct a deposition?

    Correcting small changes, such as typos or other minor transcription errors, is easily accomplished without impacting your case. For more substantive changes, you must weigh the value of correcting the transcript before trial and potentially opening up new challenges in the case to the impact of changing testimony on the stand during the trial.

  • Who Should Attend a Deposition?

    During a deposition, the conference room generally holds only the deponent, examiner, deponent’s counsel, and the court reporter. Other attorneys may be present, depending on the case. Legal depositions aren’t generally entertaining affairs that attract eager viewers, but in some cases, it may be appropriate to rent a larger conference room in Palo Alto, California, to seat additional people.

    If there is a language barrier, it is necessary to have an interpreter present. Ideally, that interpreter should have extensive experience working in legal settings, and he or she should have general knowledge of industry-specific terms that may come up. It’s also a good idea to have a videographer present to capture a visual record of the deposition. The examiner may decide to have a portion of the video recording admitted into court as evidence to be shown to the jury. Less commonly, an expert or consultant may attend the deposition. They may be asked to lend their expertise on particularly technical subjects. If the presence of a consultant is not desirable, the attorney may suspend the deposition and request a court order to exclude the unwanted party.

    Court reporting services in San Jose

  • Essential Tips for Using Deposition Testimony in Court

    When you exit the conference room after a successful deposition, you might already be planning how to best use the court reporter’s transcript to prepare your case for trial. However, you shouldn’t neglect to plan for the use of deposition testimony in front of the jury. Consider looking for legal videography services in Palo Alto, California to help you put together a courtroom-worthy presentation.

    Use of deposition testimony in San Jose

    Check the local court rules.

    The introduction and use of deposition testimony in court is subject to state and local court rules. Always check these rules to ensure you are in full compliance. You may need to provide pretrial disclosures for any portion of the transcript you will use during the trial and for any legal videography you plan to introduce.

    Lodge the official deposition transcript.

    The court reporter will give the deposition witness and all the parties written notice when the original transcript is ready to be read, corrected, and signed. Under the California Code of Civil Procedure , the deponent has 30 days to perform these actions. Then when the case is set to begin trial, the attorney who has custody of the original transcript must file the document with the court. In some cases, a transcript with the court reporter’s certification may be lodged when the witness is introduced to testify.

    Lay a foundation for the deposition testimony.

    Before you can read part of the deposition testimony to the court, you must identify it for the court reporter’s record and ask permission for yourself or your witness to read from it. In some cases, it may be appropriate to use foundational testimony. Foundational testimony serves to enlighten the jury about the significance of deposition testimony and any inconsistencies in the witness’ statements. For example, you could ask the following questions:

    • Do you remember giving this testimony?
    • Do you recall being under oath to tell the truth?
    • Did you have an attorney present to represent you?

    Then you can launch into a line of questioning that highlights the witness’ inconsistent testimony. It may help your case to show a clip of video-recorded testimony from the deposition and compare it to the witness’ testimony during the trial.

  • Is Your Conference Room ADA-Compliant?

    When choosing a conference room for your video conference or deposition, one thing to consider about the space is whether it meets ADA guidelines. When you’re hiring a video conferencing company in Palo Alto, be sure to ask about ADA compliance before you select a facility, so that all the attendees can access the space with ease.

    ADA compliance for conference rooms addresses vision impairments, hearing disorders, mobility issues, and a range of other disabilities. The conference space should have good acoustics, adequate lighting, and ample space for people who use mobility devices to comfortably maneuver. You may also want to consider arranging for a court reporter to provide real-time translation for the session. If someone attending your video conference needs assistance, solicit information about their requirements before the session so that you can make additional arrangements, such as Braille documents, to accommodate his or her needs effectively.

    conference - room

  • Is Your Law Firm Tech-Savvy Yet?

    Technological advances are leaving no industry behind, including the legal field. To be competitive and to provide your clients with the best possible service, you need to be on the cutting edge of everything from video conferencing to legal videography in Palo Alto . Is your law firm using the right technology? Here are some tools you could be using in your practice.

    legal - computer

    Video Conferencing

    Video conferencing offers major benefits to attorneys and their clients. When you opt for a video conference over a face-to-face meeting, you save both time and money. Video conferencing lets you conduct interviews and even depositions remotely, so you don’t have to pay for any travel expenses. You can also use the time that would otherwise have been spent traveling to focus on case preparation. Clients appreciate these benefits as well, because it keeps the costs of their cases down. If your law firm doesn’t have a conference room that is adequately equipped for video conferencing, rent a room at a facility that offers conferencing spaces as well as trained staff who can help you avoid any glitches that could derail your conference.

    Legal Videography

    For attorneys, legal videography can be a game changer. By hiring a videographer to record your depositions, you create an easy-to-reference recording that you can use both during case preparation and at trial. Coupled with the transcript created by your court reporter, legal videography can be an extremely beneficial resource. Be sure to hire a professional legal videographer who can capture high-quality audio and video for you. Poor quality videos may be less useful for you as you prepare your case and may not be allowed to be presented at trial.

    Digitized Documents

    Gone are the days in which attorneys have to lug around boxes and boxes of case files. By digitizing your documents, you can access them from anywhere and you can share them as needed. Talk to your court reporter about legal document digitization and security to ensure your client’s privacy is always protected.

  • Using Videography to Organize Your Case

    Legal videography can play a powerful role in your case preparation. By syncing video to the legal transcript, case organization is easier than ever before. Here are some of the benefits of working with a legal videographer in Palo Alto when you are preparing your case.

    Legal videography takes depositions to the next level, making them incredibly easy to reference and review. Professional videographers are skilled in syncing the video to the deposition transcripts, so that every clip is ready to use whenever you need it. Use the videos to pull up segments of testimony and review critical information, or simply watch the videos while you are reading the transcripts, so you can visually see each witness’ behavior and tone when providing his or her answers. You can easily edit clips to present at trial, or you can use them in the discovery process to make sharing information easier. With so many uses for legal videography, many attorneys prefer to conduct depositions with a videographer on hand.

    Legal videography by Pulone Reporting Services