• FAQs About Using Documents During Remote Depositions

    Conducting remote depositions via video conference, you can save a great deal of time and money. However, there are some challenges in remote depositions that don’t exist for in-person meetings. One such issue is how to use documents when your meeting is conducted through video conferencing. If you are considering arranging a remote deposition but are wondering how to manage the documents you’ll need during testimony, here are the answers to some of the questions you may have on your mind.

    Will I have to submit my documents in advance?

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    Although sending documents in advance is one way to deal with the issue, doing so has its disadvantages. Showing the other side the documents you plan to use during the deposition will give them a chance to prepare for your questions, eliminating any element of surprise that could work in your favor. Instead of sending documents to opposing counsel in advance, you may wish to send your documents to your court reporting firm to reveal the documents in real time, as you would during an in-person deposition.

    How can I see modifications of a document?

    If it is necessary for a witness in a deposition to modify a document at your request, you will need to see that he or she has done so in the way you asked. Although holding up the document to the camera gives you a chance to get a closer look, it can be more efficient to have your court reporter present the document digitally and for modifications to be made to the digital file in real time, so that everyone who is viewing the document can see the modifications at once.

    Can I use multiple documents during a remote deposition?

    Once you master the ability to transmit documents during a video conference deposition, then using multiple documents is simple. The trick is to work with your court reporting firm to prepare for the deposition, so that they can manage the documents and ensure they are each shared in the order and at the time you intend for the witnesses to see them.

  • Making a Good Impression on Camera

    Video conferencing is being used with greater frequency, as it’s convenient and allows professionals to cut down on time spent traveling. Perhaps the most effective way to make a great impression on camera is to rent a conference room in the Bay Area that has the right equipment for professional video conferencing, as it prevents the possibility of serious technical glitches. Next, you’ll need to dress professionally for the camera. Find out how by watching the accompanying video.

    It features a professional speaker who recommends getting in touch with the host of the video to ask about the background. If the background is a green screen, don’t wear anything green. If it’s a white background, choose darker colors for contrast. In addition, stick to solid colors without patterns.

  • When Should You Use an Interpreter for a Video Conference?

    During a video conference in the Bay Area , an interpreter can be a valuable resource. There are several instances in which interpreting may be needed during video conferencing, and these circumstances are only becoming more common in today’s global marketplace. Here are just a few of the instances in which an interpreter can be helpful in your video conference.

    You’re conducting a deposition with a language barrier.

    Using an Interpreter for a Video Conference

    If you’re conducting a remote deposition via video conference with someone who speaks a different language, working with a court certified interpreter is key. It is extremely important for the person being deposed to understand your questions exactly and to be able to convey precise answers to you. An interpreter can help not only with translating the testimony word for word but also with capturing context and idioms that could otherwise interfere with understanding. When you hire an interpreter for a legal proceeding, make sure that person speaks the same dialect of the language as the person being deposed.

    You’re hosting an international business meeting.

    In an international company, video conferencing brings people together without the expense of travel and accommodation. However, language barriers can present difficulties in sharing information that can only be overcome with an interpreter. You may need multiple interpreters to take part in the same meeting if you have locations across several countries. Interpreters can also help businesses conduct transactions across borders with customers who speak a different language. Hiring an interpreter for this kind of transaction lets your business ensure that your customers understand all of the aspects of the deal.

    You’re a doctor conducting telemedicine visits.

    Video conferencing is instrumental in providing healthcare access to people in rural locations through telemedicine services. However, doctors and patients need to be able to communicate freely with each other, and when they don’t speak the same language, that will be impossible. An interpreter can make sure patients get the care they need and help doctors understand what their patients are telling them.

  • Hosting a Video Conference? Avoid These Etiquette Mistakes

    Video conferencing makes it easier than ever to host remote depositions and conduct business across borders without travel costs. To get the most from your video conference, however, there are certain etiquette rules to follow to ensure that your event goes smoothly. If you are hosting a video conference in San Jose, avoid these mistakes to prevent confusion and delays from taking over your session.

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    Mistake: Not Testing Your System

    Nothing slows down video conferences like problems with connections, audio, and video. Test out your video conferencing system before you attempt your conference so you don’t waste participants’ time. Even better, work with an experienced team that can help you choose the right video conferencing solutions for your needs. When you work with professionals who host video conferences on a regular basis, you can feel confident that their system is reliable and that their conference space is set up for optimum audio and visual output.

    Mistake: Not Using Your Normal Voice

    During a video conference, as long as you direct your speech towards the microphone, there is no reason to shout or dramatically slow down your speech. Speak normally, being as careful as you would during an in-person meeting to enunciate. Resist mumbling or speaking excessively quickly. This kind of speech is difficult to understand in an in-person meeting and even more challenging during a video conference. Keep in mind that there is typically a small delay in audio transmission during video conferences, so pause at the end of your statement to let people hear the entire thing and have time to respond, if necessary.

  • Is Your Law Firm Tech-Savvy Yet?

    Technological advances are leaving no industry behind, including the legal field. To be competitive and to provide your clients with the best possible service, you need to be on the cutting edge of everything from video conferencing to legal videography in Palo Alto . Is your law firm using the right technology? Here are some tools you could be using in your practice.

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    Video Conferencing

    Video conferencing offers major benefits to attorneys and their clients. When you opt for a video conference over a face-to-face meeting, you save both time and money. Video conferencing lets you conduct interviews and even depositions remotely, so you don’t have to pay for any travel expenses. You can also use the time that would otherwise have been spent traveling to focus on case preparation. Clients appreciate these benefits as well, because it keeps the costs of their cases down. If your law firm doesn’t have a conference room that is adequately equipped for video conferencing, rent a room at a facility that offers conferencing spaces as well as trained staff who can help you avoid any glitches that could derail your conference.

    Legal Videography

    For attorneys, legal videography can be a game changer. By hiring a videographer to record your depositions, you create an easy-to-reference recording that you can use both during case preparation and at trial. Coupled with the transcript created by your court reporter, legal videography can be an extremely beneficial resource. Be sure to hire a professional legal videographer who can capture high-quality audio and video for you. Poor quality videos may be less useful for you as you prepare your case and may not be allowed to be presented at trial.

    Digitized Documents

    Gone are the days in which attorneys have to lug around boxes and boxes of case files. By digitizing your documents, you can access them from anywhere and you can share them as needed. Talk to your court reporter about legal document digitization and security to ensure your client’s privacy is always protected.

  • Using Videography to Organize Your Case

    Legal videography can play a powerful role in your case preparation. By syncing video to the legal transcript, case organization is easier than ever before. Here are some of the benefits of working with a legal videographer in Palo Alto when you are preparing your case.

    Legal videography takes depositions to the next level, making them incredibly easy to reference and review. Professional videographers are skilled in syncing the video to the deposition transcripts, so that every clip is ready to use whenever you need it. Use the videos to pull up segments of testimony and review critical information, or simply watch the videos while you are reading the transcripts, so you can visually see each witness’ behavior and tone when providing his or her answers. You can easily edit clips to present at trial, or you can use them in the discovery process to make sharing information easier. With so many uses for legal videography, many attorneys prefer to conduct depositions with a videographer on hand.

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  • Top Mistakes to Avoid in Your Video Conference

    Video conferencing is a very effective way to cut the costs of out-of-town depositions by allowing you to meet and participate remotely. A court reporter can provide a legal transcription of the video conference in the same way one would at an in-person deposition. Although video conferences can be both convenient and reliable, there are a few mistakes that can make them less effective than they could be. If you decide to use video conferencing in San Jose for your next deposition, be sure to avoid these mistakes.

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    Not Trying the Technology

    The worst time to try your video conferencing technology is when your meeting is starting. Be sure to have a dry run with the technology before the deposition to ensure that you won’t have any needless delays on the day of your deposition. Often, your court reporter may be able to assist with the technology, particularly if you choose a reporter whose company offers video conferencing. However, you should still be sure to understand how it works and what features are available well in advance of your deposition.

    Not Speaking Clearly

    Because you are not in the same space as the person to whom you are speaking, being clear and direct is more important than ever. Make an effort to keep your questions as succinct as possible, and use clear language. Annunciate your words clearly for the benefit of the other parties and your court reporter. Look at the person to whom you are speaking via the camera when you’re talking. It’s easier to become distracted during a video conference than at an in-person meeting, so speaking into the camera will help to keep the other party engaged.

    Not Having a Schedule

    Video conference meetings require a more strict schedule than an in-person deposition might. First, you must always keep in mind that the remote location of your video conference may be in a different time zone, affecting your deposition schedule. If your conversation needs to extend beyond the scheduled time, set a new projected finish time, so that everyone knows what to expect. If you plan for a long deposition, make sure you build breaks into the day. Everyone, including your court reporter, will need time to stretch and eat during the day. Consider taking more breaks than normal during a video conferencing session, since it can be more difficult to stay focused.

  • The Benefits of Video Conferencing

    Video conferencing is transforming the way that legal practices handle their cases. Watch this video, which discusses how video conferencing is changing education, to find out some of the benefits of these remote conferences.

    Video conferencing allows meetings to occur over long distances without traveling. For legal practices, video conferencing makes it possible for depositions to happen with remote witnesses without the expense and inconvenience of traveling. It can also allow lawyers in different locations to collaborate on cases with ease.

    At Pulone Reporting Services , our skilled court reporters in Palo Alto, California are trained in video conferencing solutions and can assist you in setting up a conference room and other tools you will need for remote depositions. To learn more about our services, please call (408) 280-1252.

  • Smart Tips for Successful Video Conferencing

    With video conferencing solutions in Palo Alto, California, you can simplify and expedite business meetings or legal proceedings. However, it is important to prepare for a video conference to avoid simple mistakes that could derail your meeting.

    Be ready for your video conference a few minutes early so that you can ensure all of the audio and visual connections are ready to go on your end. Be sure that there is a reliable internet connection in your location, and close the blinds on any windows in the room. Consider using a headset with a microphone for the clearest communication. You may want to look into using a professional video conferencing service or conference room rental that provides all of the technology you need to ensure that your meeting is professional, effective, and enjoyable.

    Best Practices for Video Conferencing

  • Engaging Participants During Your Video Conference

    The most challenging part of a video conference isn’t the planning or the technology. Instead, it is actually engaging your participants as effectively as you would at a face-to-face event. Fortunately, many of the same strategies you would use in person can be applied for video conferencing, albeit in slightly tweaked formats. If you are planning a video conference in Palo Alto, California , work closely with the court reporting firm that is facilitating the teleconferencing event to play each portion of the conference carefully. These tips will also help ensure that you keep your participants involved with your presentation.

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    Break Down Your Content

    If you have multiple things you want to communicate during your video conference, resist the urge to present it all in a single monologue. Instead, break down each point into a presentation that is no longer than 15 minutes. By chunking the information in this way, you can keep your participants’ attention and get them to focus on each piece of information you are trying to convey. Break up your information chunks by giving small breaks or switching to an interactive activity before returning to delivering additional points.

    Vary Your Media

    Just as you wouldn’t do an in-person presentation that doesn’t involve some visual aids, don’t conduct a video conference in which you rely exclusively on speaking into the camera. Include graphics, videos, and other visual aids to hold the attention of your participants and make your presentation interesting.

    Make It Interactive

    Your participants may not be in the same room, but that doesn’t mean that your video conference can’t be interactive. Although it is helpful for people to mute their mics when there is a formal presentation taking place, you can open up the floor for conversation by sprinkling chances for interaction throughout the conference. If the number of participants makes it difficult to completely open the floor, do so in stages to allow smaller groups a window of time to speak. You can also keep a chat window open throughout the conference and use it to encourage discussion.