• Is Your Conference Room ADA-Compliant?

    When choosing a conference room for your video conference or deposition, one thing to consider about the space is whether it meets ADA guidelines. When you’re hiring a video conferencing company in Palo Alto, be sure to ask about ADA compliance before you select a facility, so that all the attendees can access the space with ease.

    ADA compliance for conference rooms addresses vision impairments, hearing disorders, mobility issues, and a range of other disabilities. The conference space should have good acoustics, adequate lighting, and ample space for people who use mobility devices to comfortably maneuver. You may also want to consider arranging for a court reporter to provide real-time translation for the session. If someone attending your video conference needs assistance, solicit information about their requirements before the session so that you can make additional arrangements, such as Braille documents, to accommodate his or her needs effectively.

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  • Get the Answers to Your Questions About Video Conferences

    Video conferences are changing the way people do business. From lawyers using video conferences for depositions to companies using video conferences instead of hosting business trips, video is connecting people like never before. If you are considering conducting a video conference in Palo Alto , you’re likely to have some questions about what to expect. Here is what you need to know.

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    When should I consider using video conferencing?

    Any time you need to have a meeting with someone out of town, you can replace the physical meeting with a video conference. Video conferencing can be used to connect a large number of meeting participants who are scattered around the globe, or it can be used to simply connect two people for a discussion. Video conferences can be used for business meetings and for depositions, if you follow legal guidelines for recording the deposition. Your court reporter can help you set up your deposition appropriately.

    What are the benefits of video conferencing?

    Video conferencing is both cost-effective and convenient. By conducting a meeting via video, you can avoid all of the expenses involved with traveling, from airline tickets to hotel fees and food. When you host a conference with people in many different locations, that can add up to significant savings for your business. You can also avoid the wasted time involved in traveling for a single meeting. Simply log on, conduct your meeting by video, and get back to your usual activities.

    What should I consider before I have a video conference?

    Before you have a video conference, you will need to ensure that you have an appropriate location with adequate audio and visual tools. Your standard computer mic and camera will usually not be sufficient, so you may wish to consider renting space in a dedicated video conferencing room staffed by professionals who can ensure that your conference goes smoothly.

  • Mistakes to Avoid When Working with an Interpreter

    When you need interpreter services for your deposition, it’s important to avoid certain mistakes that could leave the reliability of the legal transcript in doubt. If you are working with an interpreter in Palo Alto on your case, be sure to avoid these mistakes to get the best possible outcome from your deposition.

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    Not Hiring a Professional

    Not everyone who speaks a language fluently serve as an interpreter for a deposition. Don’t cut corners when you hire someone and try to save money by bringing in someone who simply speaks the language. Work with a court interpreter who is certified in the language of the deponent to ensure that your deposition will be valid and accepted in court. This will also allow you to communicate freely and clearly with the witnesses you need to question. Often, when you hire a court reporter, the same firm may offer court interpretation services, which means you also get the advantage of working with a court reporter and certified interpreter who are accustomed to working together.

    Not Preparing in Advance

    If the case for which you require the interpreter involves specialized terminology, it is best to meet with the interpreter in advance and prepare them for what to expect. In some cases, the interpreter may wish to do some research into terms independently to ensure that he or she is prepared to correctly convey your dialogue for the subject matter being discussed. This can help to avoid unnecessary delays during the deposition itself.

    Not Speaking to the Witness

    When you are using a legal interpreter, resist the urge to speak to the interpreter during your questions and instead speak directly to the witness. Even if the witness needs the interpreter to translate your words, facial expressions, tone of voice, and gestures can communicate a great deal about what you are saying and the manner in which the witness is replying to your questions. These non-verbal communication cues are integral to a complete understanding of the complexities of your conversation.

  • The Role of the Court Reporter in the Corporate Setting

    Court reporting services aren’t just needed in legal depositions and courtroom cases. There are several ways in which having a certified shorthand reporter can also be helpful in the corporate setting. Here are just a few of the reasons you should consider hiring a court reporter in San Jose to assist in your company’s activities.

    A court reporter’s record is helpful in the corporate world for much the same reason that it’s required in the legal setting: because relying on memory alone to recall details of important interactions is faulty. A court reporter can be valuable to your company by creating an accurate transcript of interviews, business meetings, and other interactions. The transcript can then be used to review details that were discussed and decisions that had been made, without any misunderstandings that can arise because of inaccurate memories. Court reporters are also the best source of video conferencing solutions and can provide certified recordings of interactions that occur via video conference, so your business can make greater use of remote meetings and interviews without any concerns about maintaining an accurate record of the discussions.

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  • Top Mistakes to Avoid in Your Video Conference

    Video conferencing is a very effective way to cut the costs of out-of-town depositions by allowing you to meet and participate remotely. A court reporter can provide a legal transcription of the video conference in the same way one would at an in-person deposition. Although video conferences can be both convenient and reliable, there are a few mistakes that can make them less effective than they could be. If you decide to use video conferencing in San Jose for your next deposition, be sure to avoid these mistakes.

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    Not Trying the Technology

    The worst time to try your video conferencing technology is when your meeting is starting. Be sure to have a dry run with the technology before the deposition to ensure that you won’t have any needless delays on the day of your deposition. Often, your court reporter may be able to assist with the technology, particularly if you choose a reporter whose company offers video conferencing. However, you should still be sure to understand how it works and what features are available well in advance of your deposition.

    Not Speaking Clearly

    Because you are not in the same space as the person to whom you are speaking, being clear and direct is more important than ever. Make an effort to keep your questions as succinct as possible, and use clear language. Annunciate your words clearly for the benefit of the other parties and your court reporter. Look at the person to whom you are speaking via the camera when you’re talking. It’s easier to become distracted during a video conference than at an in-person meeting, so speaking into the camera will help to keep the other party engaged.

    Not Having a Schedule

    Video conference meetings require a more strict schedule than an in-person deposition might. First, you must always keep in mind that the remote location of your video conference may be in a different time zone, affecting your deposition schedule. If your conversation needs to extend beyond the scheduled time, set a new projected finish time, so that everyone knows what to expect. If you plan for a long deposition, make sure you build breaks into the day. Everyone, including your court reporter, will need time to stretch and eat during the day. Consider taking more breaks than normal during a video conferencing session, since it can be more difficult to stay focused.

  • Crucial Questions to Ask During a Deposition

    Every deposition is different, but there is some critical information that you will want on in the transcript, no matter who is testifying. As you focus on crafting your questions for your deposition, don’t lose sight of the basic information you need the court reporter to transcribe about every witness you depose. Get ready for your deposition in San Jose by making sure these questions are on your list.

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    Have you ever been arrested, and if so, were you convicted?

    In almost every instance, you should ask about the arrest and conviction record of every witness you depose. This information could have an impact on the case at hand, and it could call into question the reliability of a witness. The answer to these questions can also be helpful if the case goes to trial and you need to impeach a witness on the stand. You should do your own research into the arrest and conviction records of the witnesses before you depose them, so you know what to expect and can recognize any incorrect information the witness provides during the deposition.

    Have you ever testified in a deposition or trial?

    It is always helpful to know if a witness has testified in a case before this deposition. First, it can give you an indication of how nervous or composed the witness may be. Knowledge of past testimony experience can also give you insight into the witness’ role in past cases and if he or she was considered to be truthful. This information can help shape your approach during your deposition.

    How did you prepare for this deposition?

    By questioning the witness about how he or she prepared for the deposition, you can identify areas in which he or she may have underprepared, so you can focus on those parts of the case. Finding out how the witness prepared may reveal to you what parts of the case the opposing attorney views as the most important. Be sure to also ask who was present when the witness prepared with the attorney, because having a third-party present can mean that privilege was waived.

  • Behind the Scenes of a Successful Video Conference

    No matter what subject your video conference in Palo Alto, California is about, the same components should always be involved. Since you won’t all be in the same conference room in person, there are extra steps that you should take to ensure that you get your point across clearly and without interruptions. Watch this video clip for a behind the scenes look at a successful video conference.

    Whether the video conference involves an attorney meeting with a client or a team of coworkers working on a project while on different sides of the planet, it helps to get everything set up early. This way you can get to know the technology, load any presentations you might need, and make sure everything is in working order. Keep in mind you’ll need to understand a few different kinds of technology for a successful presentation, from cameras and video displays to microphones and speakers.

  • Common Questions Clients Have About Discovery

    Discovery is the investigative phase of preparing for a lawsuit. It takes place before a trial begins and outside of the courtroom, usually involving depositions that can occur face-to-face or remotely with video conferencing technology . It’s common for clients to have questions about what happens during discovery and what they will need to reveal about their case. Here are the answers to some common questions about the discovery process.

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    What information is shared during discovery?

    Generally, any information that is relevant to the case, even if only tangentially, has to be provided to the opposing side during discovery, if it is requested. Only information that is legally protected or privileged is exempted. This information may include anything a witness saw, heard, or said that is relevant to the case; the identity of anyone who may have additional information about the case; and any documents that relate to the dispute. Only information that was obtained through privileged conversations, such as between husband and wife or lawyer and client, is excluded from discovery. In some cases, information that violates someone’s privacy, such as information about health or sexual orientation, is exempt as well. Sometimes, the court may require that information be disclosed during discovery but may bar the other side from sharing it and leave it out of the court record to protect confidential or private information.

    How is information obtained during discovery?

    Depositions are part of most discovery processes. They can happen in a central location in person, or they may be conducted via video conferencing. A court reporter will record the deposition as the attorneys question witnesses to obtain information. Interrogatories are similar to depositions, except that the questions are written, but answers are still given under oath. The attorneys may also ask for specific evidence and request admission of certain facts so that the two sides don’t need to argue about basic, agreed-upon information.

    Pulone Reporting Services can make your discovery process easier with conference room rentals, legal transcription, and court reporting in Palo Alto, California and the Silicon Valley area. To schedule one of our services, please call (408) 280-1252.

  • What Can Pulone Reporting Services Do for You?

    When you need court reporters or video conferencing in Palo Alto, California, choose Pulone Reporting Services . We have been serving the legal community for more than three decades and offer the very latest in courtroom and deposition technology with a special emphasis on customer service.

    Watch this video to learn more about Pulone Reporting Services and how we can work for you. From video depositions to digital transcription, Pulone Reporting provides Certified Shorthand Reporters who are licensed in California and who average over 20 years of reporting experience. We can help your firm take advantage of new technology to conduct the most efficient and effective depositions possible, even if tools like video conferencing, legal videography, and document digitizing are new to you. Contact us today for all of your court reporting needs and find out why the legal community has been relying on our accuracy and attention to detail for 35 years and counting.

  • The Savvy Witness’s Guide to Preparing for a Video Deposition

    Facing a video deposition can be nerve wracking, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Before you face the video conferencing screen, the court reporters, and the attorneys, take some time to prepare, so you can answer questions with confidence and get through the deposition as quickly as possible. When you have a video conference deposition in Palo Alto, California scheduled, get ready with these tips.

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    Get Advice from the Pros

    Review in full what to expect at the deposition with the attorney who is representing you. He or she can give important advice about how to answer questions and how to deal with any disputes that may arise, as well as helpful information about what to expect. There is a good chance the attorney will want to closely review your testimony with you before the deposition. Take advantage of this time to get comfortable with your testimony, so you can answer questions with ease.

    Dress Appropriately

    For a video deposition, you should choose professional dress, as though you were going to court to testify. Keep in mind that you will be on camera, so consider wearing clothing in colors that are easy to pick up on camera. Generally, light, solid colors and clothing without patterns work best on camera. Don’t wear anything uncomfortable. You should look at ease while giving your testimony rather than awkward and fidgety because your clothing is not comfortable.

    Be Direct

    When you are being questioned, answer exactly what is being asked as simply as possible. Avoid adding extra details that could open up additional avenues of questioning. Keep a neutral expression, even if the line of questioning frustrates you. You will be wearing a mic, so resist the urge to mutter under your breath, as it will be recorded. Keep a calm and neutral tone of voice, and try to avoid long pauses, which can make your answers seem evasive. Speak clearly, so that the transcript and recording reflect exactly what you are saying.