• Mistakes to Avoid When Working with an Interpreter

    When you need interpreter services for your deposition, it’s important to avoid certain mistakes that could leave the reliability of the legal transcript in doubt. If you are working with an interpreter in Palo Alto on your case, be sure to avoid these mistakes to get the best possible outcome from your deposition.

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    Not Hiring a Professional

    Not everyone who speaks a language fluently serve as an interpreter for a deposition. Don’t cut corners when you hire someone and try to save money by bringing in someone who simply speaks the language. Work with a court interpreter who is certified in the language of the deponent to ensure that your deposition will be valid and accepted in court. This will also allow you to communicate freely and clearly with the witnesses you need to question. Often, when you hire a court reporter, the same firm may offer court interpretation services, which means you also get the advantage of working with a court reporter and certified interpreter who are accustomed to working together.

    Not Preparing in Advance

    If the case for which you require the interpreter involves specialized terminology, it is best to meet with the interpreter in advance and prepare them for what to expect. In some cases, the interpreter may wish to do some research into terms independently to ensure that he or she is prepared to correctly convey your dialogue for the subject matter being discussed. This can help to avoid unnecessary delays during the deposition itself.

    Not Speaking to the Witness

    When you are using a legal interpreter, resist the urge to speak to the interpreter during your questions and instead speak directly to the witness. Even if the witness needs the interpreter to translate your words, facial expressions, tone of voice, and gestures can communicate a great deal about what you are saying and the manner in which the witness is replying to your questions. These non-verbal communication cues are integral to a complete understanding of the complexities of your conversation.

  • Using Videography to Organize Your Case

    Legal videography can play a powerful role in your case preparation. By syncing video to the legal transcript, case organization is easier than ever before. Here are some of the benefits of working with a legal videographer in Palo Alto when you are preparing your case.

    Legal videography takes depositions to the next level, making them incredibly easy to reference and review. Professional videographers are skilled in syncing the video to the deposition transcripts, so that every clip is ready to use whenever you need it. Use the videos to pull up segments of testimony and review critical information, or simply watch the videos while you are reading the transcripts, so you can visually see each witness’ behavior and tone when providing his or her answers. You can easily edit clips to present at trial, or you can use them in the discovery process to make sharing information easier. With so many uses for legal videography, many attorneys prefer to conduct depositions with a videographer on hand.

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  • The Role of the Court Reporter in the Corporate Setting

    Court reporting services aren’t just needed in legal depositions and courtroom cases. There are several ways in which having a certified shorthand reporter can also be helpful in the corporate setting. Here are just a few of the reasons you should consider hiring a court reporter in San Jose to assist in your company’s activities.

    A court reporter’s record is helpful in the corporate world for much the same reason that it’s required in the legal setting: because relying on memory alone to recall details of important interactions is faulty. A court reporter can be valuable to your company by creating an accurate transcript of interviews, business meetings, and other interactions. The transcript can then be used to review details that were discussed and decisions that had been made, without any misunderstandings that can arise because of inaccurate memories. Court reporters are also the best source of video conferencing solutions and can provide certified recordings of interactions that occur via video conference, so your business can make greater use of remote meetings and interviews without any concerns about maintaining an accurate record of the discussions.

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  • Top Mistakes to Avoid in Your Video Conference

    Video conferencing is a very effective way to cut the costs of out-of-town depositions by allowing you to meet and participate remotely. A court reporter can provide a legal transcription of the video conference in the same way one would at an in-person deposition. Although video conferences can be both convenient and reliable, there are a few mistakes that can make them less effective than they could be. If you decide to use video conferencing in San Jose for your next deposition, be sure to avoid these mistakes.

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    Not Trying the Technology

    The worst time to try your video conferencing technology is when your meeting is starting. Be sure to have a dry run with the technology before the deposition to ensure that you won’t have any needless delays on the day of your deposition. Often, your court reporter may be able to assist with the technology, particularly if you choose a reporter whose company offers video conferencing. However, you should still be sure to understand how it works and what features are available well in advance of your deposition.

    Not Speaking Clearly

    Because you are not in the same space as the person to whom you are speaking, being clear and direct is more important than ever. Make an effort to keep your questions as succinct as possible, and use clear language. Annunciate your words clearly for the benefit of the other parties and your court reporter. Look at the person to whom you are speaking via the camera when you’re talking. It’s easier to become distracted during a video conference than at an in-person meeting, so speaking into the camera will help to keep the other party engaged.

    Not Having a Schedule

    Video conference meetings require a more strict schedule than an in-person deposition might. First, you must always keep in mind that the remote location of your video conference may be in a different time zone, affecting your deposition schedule. If your conversation needs to extend beyond the scheduled time, set a new projected finish time, so that everyone knows what to expect. If you plan for a long deposition, make sure you build breaks into the day. Everyone, including your court reporter, will need time to stretch and eat during the day. Consider taking more breaks than normal during a video conferencing session, since it can be more difficult to stay focused.